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Prematurity and Developmental Delay

Published: May 25, 2017 | 4 minute read
Categories: Hurt Kids / Hurt Kids Success Stories / Success Stories with Brain Injured Children

Reo Embraces a Brighter Future

Reo’s mother had a difficult pregnancy, and at sixth months the baby was born by emergency C-section. With a birth weight of one kilogram, the baby was cyanotic, jaundiced, and in respiratory distress.

Reo

Reo in traditional kimono and hakama celebrating the New Year’s holiday. Here he is holding a cat figure that customarily welcomes visitors to the home.

Reo’s mother had a difficult pregnancy, and at sixth months the baby was born by emergency C-section. With a birth weight of one kilogram, the baby was cyanotic, jaundiced, and in respiratory distress.

At two years, Reo could not walk or use his hands, breath or sleep well and he had poor bowel and bladder control.

Baby Reo was on a respirator for the first month of life, and he remained hospitalized for the first three months. He was fed with a syringe throughout his hospital stay. He required surgery for a heart defect and for the premature development of his eyes.

When Reo was three months old, his mother began to stimulate his vision by showing him large reading words. When he was two years old, his mother attended the What To Do About Your Brain-Injured Child Course.

His mother was determined that the future for her little boy would be much brighter than the one predicted.

At two and a half years, Reo could not yet walk. He had difficulty using his hands, due to a tremor and lack of strength. His breathing and sleep were poor as was his bowel and bladder control. He had many allergies and digestive problems, often he was only able to eat porridge. Parents had been told when he was a baby that he would likely “develop cerebral palsy” later on.

His mother was determined that the future for her little boy would be much brighter than the one predicted. She began a home program that included tactile stimulation and a careful nutritional program. She gave him the maximum opportunity to move on the floor, in addition to increasing his reading, encyclopedic knowledge and math programs. He began to develop at a much faster pace. By three years of age, Reo was walking, and six months later he began to run.

After a year of program, Reo could read books that were above his age level.

When Reo was four years old his parents brought him for his first visit to The Institutes. He had poor depth perception, was very sensitive to sounds and cried when he was so upset by the noises outside that he often cried. His speech was repetitive, and he was not yet able to dress himself.

Within another year, Reo could read books that were above his age level. Reo could now brachiate independently, and he had begun to write. He could dress and undress himself.

Reo

Reo is a bookwarm.

Before his sixth birthday, Reo could write at the second-grade level. Thanks to his excellent nutritional program Reo had a full year of perfect health. Best of all his communication was improving. He was beginning to be able to tell a story from beginning to end and have spontaneous conversations.

When he was six years old, Reo was able to hop across the room and run more than 2 kilometers non-stop. He was reading at the junior-high level and using the computer to research and create papers. His perfect health continued for the next three years.

Reo

Along the way Reo learned to play the piano - here he performs at the Steinway in a formal concert.

After three years on the Intensive Treatment Program, Reo’s family and the staff of The Institutes agreed that Reo was ready for Graduation-to-Life. This provides the opportunity for the child to use his abilities and demonstrate that he is physically, intellectually and socially ready to take his place in the world.

Piano, Aikido and studying and performing Kyogen and Noh dramas are a part of his daily life now.

Reo is continuing to be homeschooled and he attends school for a short time every day. He is well ahead of his peers intellectually especially in writing, and he participates in Aikido classes every week. His studies at home included organic chemistry.

Reo

Reo is now learning Aikido and the ancient theatrical art of Noh and Kyogen. Here he performs part of a Kyogen play for the parents on the Intensive Treatment Program in Tokyo.

As a third-grade student, he was eligible to take a science course at the local university. Today he is doing well with his academic work, he is physically excellent.

The Institutes staff were proud to announce Reo’s Graduation-to-Life. Reo’s parents have worked diligently toward the achievement of their son’s full potential. Reo and his family have achieved what many would consider the impossible.

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Reo and his proud parents

See the results that were achieved by 3,024 Brain-Injured Children View All

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