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Physical Activity can Help a Child’s Writing

Published: January 20, 2014 | 2 minute read
Categories: Manual Competence / Writing / Special Needs Children / Early Development / Physical Excellence

Physical Activity Helps Child’s Writing Skills

The following continues our series of questions commonly asked by mothers teaching their children to write. Physical activity helps child’s writing skills and especially creeping, crawling and braciation. It’s important to start your child immediately on all of these activities.

Q: What physical activities can my son do to enhance his ability to write?

A: What a good question! There are several physical activities that promote the neurological organization necessary for writing and you are wise to encourage those in your son at this time. We encourage any physical activity for children as it helps child’s writing skills.

Most Physical Activity Helps Child’s Writing But This is One of the Best!

One such activity is brachiation. The skill involved in independently traversing an overhead ladder, hand over hand in mid-air, encourages both development of visual convergence and fine manual coordination. At the same time, the chest is growing and that greater breathing capacity will help very much to provide oxygen to the brain as it is needed. All of this physical activity helps child’s writing — so we need to encourage children to do as much of it as possible.

Even more basic than brachiation, are the great benefits that are gained by crawling and creeping. These two activities effectively develop the visual and motor pathways and provide the foundation for many important neurological functions both intellectually and physically. A hundred yards of each a day (or more) will enhance sophisticated skills such as reading and writing in progressively smaller print.

See the results that were achieved by 3,024 Brain-Injured Children View All

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