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The Newborn: Let’s Mobilize Babies

Published: September 1, 2016 | 3 minute read
Categories: Success Stories with Brain Injured Children / Well Kids / crawling / creeping / cross-pattern movement / mobility / Newborns

Newborn Mobility Most Important Factor in Early Development

Without question, the single most important program for any one-day old baby is the Floor Program which promotes newborn mobility. It, more than anything else, determines whether a child will be physically excellent.

During the How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence course, great emphasis is placed on the Floor Program. Unfortunately, there is little time to go into how vital the Floor Program is to intellectual development as well.

Providing the reading program is being done properly, the only other possible reason it may not go as well as expected is that the child needs the improved midbrain development, the respiratory development and the improved convergence created by a Floor Program of newborn mobility, such as crawling and creeping.

Newborn Mobility - Get Started Immediately

The perfect way to insure that reading, language and mobility develop at hitherto unexpected rates is to start the Floor Program from day one. That literally means the first twenty-four hours of life.

It is a great pity that the world gangs up on a newborn and makes it virtually impossible to achieve an excellent Floor Program with him from day one, unless there are a determined Mom and Dad that make it happen. There are many reasons why it is so important to mobilize baby.

By eight weeks of fetal life, the fetus has clearly defined arms and legs, which he is constantly moving. When the day comes that he is big enough for Mom to feel these kicks, she is of course ecstatic. By the time the baby is born, Mom is sometimes worn out by the constant exertions of the infant.

newborn mobility

At birth he has been in training for seven months for crawling - why the importance of newborn mobility!

Simply give him the opportunity and he’ll take off. But, unfortunately, what happens is that baby is immobilized in thick padding, swaddled in reams of clothing when sleeping, and constantly held when awake. If baby is very fortunate, he may get a crack at the floor when he’s four weeks old.

Of course, during these four weeks his body weight has increased 28%—from seven pounds to nine pounds. No wonder he’s not wild about moving. If you weigh 120 pounds and sit in bed for four weeks gaining 28% of your body weight, you’ll roll out of bed at 153 pounds! Doubtless, you won’t invite movement either.

Our “floor babies,” those who start off from day one having the opportunity to move, are greatly advanced. They’re bright-eyed, capable and curious babies.

Douglas Domanby Douglas Doman

Vice Director, The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential

See the results that were achieved by 3,024 Brain-Injured Children View All

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