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Meet The Staff

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Senior Executive Staff


Janet Doman Director IAHP

Janet Doman, Director, The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential

Janet Doman has been the director of The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential (IAHP) since 1980. She grew up at The Institutes and was pitching in to help brain-injured children by the time she was nine years old. She was directly involved in The Institutes groundbreaking work in early reading. At fourteen, she illustrated one of the first books ever published that was written and designed to be read by two- and three-year-old children.

After completing studies in zoology at the University of Hull in England and physical anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, Janet devoted herself to teaching early reading programs to parents at The Institutes.

In 1974, she headed a team sent to Japan to teach English to mothers and babies at the Early Development Association in Tokyo. On her return to the United States she helped to create The Evan Thomas Institute, the first of The Institutes devoted to teaching mothers of well children how to develop their tiny children intellectually, physically, and socially.

Janet and her father updated and revised Glenn’s international best-selling books, How To Teach Your Baby To Read, How To Teach Your Baby Math and How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence. She authored the children’s book Enough, Inigo, Enough, and co-authored How Smart Is Your Baby? and How To Give Your Baby Encyclopedic Knowledge.

Janet spends most of her day teaching the parents of hurt and well children and helping them to discover the vast potential of their babies and their own potential as teachers.


Denise Malkowicz Medical Director IAHP

Dr. Denise Malkowicz, Medical Director, The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential

Dr. Denise Malkowicz was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She earned her medical degree from Hahnemann Hospital Medical School, interned at Bryn Mawr Hospital, and performed her residency in neurology at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, where she was chief resident.

Following Residency, she did two years of Fellowship in Clinical Neurophysiology and Epileptology at Medical College of Pennsylvania (MCP). She participated in epilepsy surgery and investigational drug studies in clinical trials of anti-epilepsy medications. She was Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology at MCP and a Neurologist and Clinical Neurophysicist and Epileptologist at MCP and Hahnemann Hospitals, now known as Drexel/Hahnemann.

She is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in Neurology as well as Clinical Neurophysiology. Over the years she has been an important part of the Physiology staff at The Institutes.

When her first child was born, Dr. Malkowicz learned of The Institutes programs for well children. She attended the “How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence” Course and The Graduate Course. About teaching her children she said, “Becoming a mother enriched my understanding of pediatrics, and my involvement with The Institutes has enhanced my understanding of the potential for recovery and enrichment after brain injury.”

With her extensive knowledge of neurology and seizures, Dr. Malkowicz has lead discussions at the Academy of Child Brain Development meetings. She has been involved in clinical research and medical education at The Institutes, and in 2016 she accepted the position of medical director.


Carl Weisse, D.C., Medical Staff, The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential

Dr. Carl Weisse was born in Malden, Massachusetts. He received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After establishing several successful electronics firms that made innovative products in the medical, professional sound, home entertainment, and theater businesses, he became fascinated with complementary and alternative medicine.

He continued his education, earning a doctor of chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic, where he was the first David D. Palmer chiropractic scholar and graduated with honors.

He has an extensive background in education and administration. He has taught neuroscience at Pennsylvania College of Chiropractic, where he was faculty chairperson, and anatomy and physiology at the Community College of Philadelphia.

Dr. Weisse operates a private practice in downtown Philadelphia. He has developed additions to the model of what makes brain-injured children present the way they do. He has introduced new techniques of bodywork and biofeedback, now used in The Institutes applied kinesiology program, that are specific to the physical problems faced by brain-injured children.


Dr. Mihai Dimancescu, M.D., Chairman of the Board, The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential

Dr. Mihai Dimancescu was born in England to Romanian parents. His family lived in Marrakesh, Morocco, for eight years moved to the United States in 1956. Following graduation from Yale University, he attended Trinity College, Harvard, for a year before studying medicine at the University of Toulouse.

Following his surgical residency and his neurosurgical residency, Dr. Dimancescu established his practice in neurosurgery in New York.

As founder of the International Coma Recovery Institute, Dr. Dimancescu carried the work of The Institutes into the hospital setting and into neuro-rehabilitation facilities worldwide. He has been president of the New York State Neurological Society and chairman of the board of the Coma Recovery Association.

At present, Dr. Dimancescu is chairman of the board of The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential and president of The International Academy for Child Brain Development. He retired from surgery in 2003 and is a neurosurgical consultant.


The Institute for the Achievement of Physiological Excellence


Dr. Ernesto Vasquez, Director, The Institute for Physiological Excellence

Dr. Ernesto Vasquez was born in the United States and grew up in Mexico. In 1984 he obtained his diploma as a general practitioner from the University of Baja California School of Medicine, in Mexico. He served his internship in 1985 at the Social Security Hospital in Mexicali, Baja California, and was in charge of community clinics of Morelos City, Baja California.

Ernesto first learned about The Institutes in 1982, when his sister Angelica began on the Intensive Treatment Program. Ernesto assisted with her home program and observed Angelica’s progress. He came to The Institutes in September 1986 and joined the staff of the School for Human Development. He later became medical director and then director of the School, coaching the students through every aspect of their physical, intellectual, and social program.

In 1987, he was appointed vice director of the Oxygen Enrichment Program. Now he divides his time between the research area and the Children’s Center, where he teaches physical and respiratory programs. In 1988 and 1989, Ernesto spent time working at Centro Reabilitação Nossa Senhora da Gloria with Dr. José Carlos Veras in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and for Asociação Barbacenense in Barbacena, Brazil.

Ernesto helped to present the first Spanish What To Do About Your Brain-Injured Child Video Course in Mexico City, and was involved in the preparation, translation, and dubbing in Spanish of the How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence Course, also presented in Mexico City. Ernesto has been involved in the translation, preparation, and dubbing in Spanish of the video lecture series for Spanish-speaking families.

In 1992, Ernesto became the vice director of The Institute for the Achievement of Physiological Excellence and the acting director of the same institute in Europe. He has studied and treated brain-injured children in Mexico, the United States, Italy, Japan and Brazil.

In 1993, he married Thaisa Mendes, then a staff member. They have two children who have benefited from The Institutes Early Development Program.

From 1995 to 1996, Ernesto returned to work with Dr. Jose Carlos Veras in Brazil and studied and treated brain-injured children in Argentina, Brazil, and Portugal.

He is certified in child brain development at the teaching level and he is a fellow of the Academy for Child Brain Development. For his work with brain-injured children he has received the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor, the Sakura Korosho medal, and the Statuette with Pedestal.


Dr. Li Wang, M.D., Director of Nutrition, The Institute for Physiological Excellence

Dr. Li Wang was born in China and graduated from the Shanghai Sanatorium Hospital and School of Nursing.

At Beijing Hospital, she became the first physical therapy instructor in China. While working and doing research at Ton Ren Hospital, she attended the medical school there. She served as attending physician and her research included ear acupuncture for relief of allergies and pain.

In 1983 she visited The Institutes in Philadelphia. Returning to China, she adapted The Institutes program to create a neurological stimulation program with minimal costs. She had excellent results, and in 1987 she received an award in Beijing City for scientific research in the rehabilitation of severely brain-injured children. That year, the Ministry of Health of the People’s Republic of China certified her as a physician in physical medicine and rehabilitation.

Dr. Wang joined The Institutes staff in 1989, bringing her experience and knowledge of Eastern and Western medicine to the creation of nutritional programs and pain management for brain-injured children. She maintains two clinics in China, and since 1992 The Institutes programs have helped over 500 brain-injured children there.

In 2006 she was instrumental in producing The Pathway To Wellness in Chinese, and brought members of The Institutes staff to Beijing to speak to parents about child brain development.


Richard Rosenbloom, M.D., Director of Medical Affairs, The Institute for Physiological Excellence

Dr. Richard Rosenbloom was born in Rochester, New York. After earning doctorates in medicine and nutrition science, he chaired the Department of Nutritional Medicine in a small hospital.

Two years later he entered the pharmaceutical industry, working for such companies as Asta Medica, Sanwa, and Endo Pharma. He first developed traditional drugs, but later followed his passion of developing nutritional and botanical therapeutics for a variety of disorders, such as leukemia, diabetic neuropathy, herpes, cachexia, and influenza.

Dr. Rosenbloom’s major collaborators have been from The University of London, developing a botanical anti-influenza formula, UMDNJ (University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey), and the Howard Hughes Medical Center, developing a natural radio-protectant for the effects of ionizing radiation.

Dr. Rosenbloom also developed an effective nutritional treatment for Prader-Willi Syndrome.

Outside of the laboratory and the clinic, he explores for medicinal plants in the rainforest of Puerto Rico and the jungles of Curacao.

Dr. Rosenbloom brings to The Institutes his knowledge and experience in nutritional and botanical medicine from a traditionally trained physician’s perspective.


Dr. Michael Gorman, D.C., Medical Staff, The Institute for Physiological Excellence

Dr. Michael Gorman is a licensed Chiropractic physician and board-certified Professional Applied Kinesiologist. A native Philadelphian, he received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from National University of Health Sciences in Lombard, Illinois. He completed his undergraduate study in psychology at Shippensburg University, and in sports medicine at West Chester University. Before attending Chiropractic college, Dr. Gorman worked in physical therapy and sports medicine and was a personal fitness trainer.

Blending the best of both traditional and alternative medical perspectives, Dr. Gorman’s primary diagnostic tool is an advanced specialty called Applied Kinesiology (AK). Through AK, Dr. Gorman treats the whole person by addressing his or her physical, nutritional, and emotional health, as well as addressing other factors that can interfere with health, such as electromagnetic pollution, toxicity, and evaluations and treatments for allergies. He uses muscle testing to evaluate the brain and nervous system, which oversees and controls every function in the human body.

Dr. Gorman is certified in Neuro-Emotional Technique (NET), which addresses the mind-body connection, and has taken many other courses including NeuroModulation Technique (NMT). He attempts to draw from all of his traditional and holistic experience to help brain-injured children.

As a member of the medical staff at The Institutes, he helps to evaluate and treat brain-injured children through the use of Applied Kinesiology. He also has had a role in the biofeedback program. Dr. Gorman embraces The Institutes approach of educating the parents and giving them an active role in their child’s well being and development. He and his wife have three children.


Charlotte Law, Senior Staff, The Institute for Physiological Excellence

Charlotte Law was born in Pennsylvania and grew up in a large family. After earning a bachelor’s degree in sociology and anthropology she discovered The Institutes while looking for work in her field.

Charlotte joined The Institutes staff in September 1976. After her training, she worked in the clinic in The Institute for the Achievement of Physiological Excellence. There, she taught the parents of brain-injured children how to do respiratory patterning, patterning, sensory stimulation programs, and how to improve their children’s nutrition.

During those years she traveled with the staff and taught parents of brain-injured children in Australia, Japan and Italy. She also attended the meetings of the World Organization for Human Potential that were held in Brazil, California, and Philadelphia. Additionally she was awarded the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor for her work.

When she had children, Charlotte took a leave from the clinic and enrolled her family in the Evan Thomas Institute. She taught her three sons at home full-time until they attended the Evan Thomas Institute daily. Then she assisted with various activities in the school.

At the time, she was also the contact person and support staff for parents who attended the How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence Course.

Charlotte returned to her work in the clinic in September 2007. She trained in nutrition under Dr. Li Wang, and she currently teaches nutrition programs to the parents of hurt children.

She has also traveled with the team to present the What To Do About Your Brain-Inured Child course in Madrid, Spain, and Moscow, Russia.


Yukie Kamino, Senior Staff, The Institute for Physiological Excellence

Yukie was born in Gifu, Japan. Because she enjoys working with children, Yukie joined a team that helped the Save the Children organization when she was in college. In this role she assisted teachers at the kindergarten she had attended.

Beginning as a young child, Yukie studied violin under the Suzuki Method. She therefore knew of The Institutes for many years. When she came to Philadelphia to study, Yukie took violin lessons from Julian Meyer, who is the violin director of the Evan Thomas Institute. Through his encouragement she made contact with The Institutes and began to learn more about their work with well and brain-injured children.

Yukie began her training as a staff member in February 1998. After spending a few months in the Evan Thomas Institute, she moved to the clinic to continue her training. She followed families on their visits and helped with translation for Japanese families. In June 1998, Yukie became a staff member and the coordinator for The Institute for the Achievement of Physiological Excellence.

For her work with brain-injured children, she was awarded the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor and Sakura Koro Sho.

Yukie returned to Japan and began to work in Doman Kenkyusho in April 2002. Overall, she helps the Japanese families stay in good contact with The Institutes staff, and she works with the staff when they travel to Tokyo twice a year for revisits with the Japanese families.

Though now based in Japan, Yukie visits The Institutes for a few months each year to work in the Children’s Center, and she is a member of the team that presents the What To Do About Your Brain-Injured Child Course in Singapore.


The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence


Susan Aisen Director IAHP

Susan Aisen, Director, The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence

As a graduate student at the University of Michigan, Susan began her studies and training at The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential in 1973. In 1980, she became the Director of the Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence, and the Director of the Evan Thomas Institute.

She is a principal lecturer in the “How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence” course, which has been presented since 1978 to parents the world over. She teaches parents how to enhance the growth and development of the brain through intellectual growth, specifically in reading, mathematics, and encyclopedic knowledge. She also teaches parents how to do an evaluation of their child using The Institutes Developmental Profile.

Ms. Aisen is also a principal lecturer in the “What To Do About Your Brain-Injured Child” course. She teaches parents of brain-injured children how to evaluate their children neurologically and how to create an effective program of sensory stimulation to enhance seeing, hearing, and tactility.

Susan is an international lecturer on intellectual growth in children, and has taught parents in England, Ireland, Italy, Brazil, Colombia, Malaysia, Japan, China, Singapore, Puerto Rico, and the United States how to create intellectual excellence in their children.

She served as a consultant to Glenn Doman in the writing of How To Teach Your Baby Math and How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence. She is a co-author of the book How To Give Your Baby Encyclopedic Knowledge.

Susan is a principal lecturer in The Pathway to Wellness, now available online to parents worldwide.


Teruki Uemura, Vice Director of the Children’s Center, The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence

Senior Staff Member of The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence

Teruki was born and raised in Japan. He joined The Institutes in September 1982, while he was completing his graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania.

Teruki was educated in Japan and in the United States. He received a bachelor’s degree in economics and did graduate work in business administration at Keio University in Tokyo. He then received a master’s degree in management from Northwestern University. He continued graduate studies at San Francisco State University, where he studied linguistics, and at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where he worked toward a doctorate degree in social system sciences.

He first came to The Institutes in 1979 as a translator for Japanese families on the program, and his interest in The Institutes work grew steadily.

Teruki began his training as a staff member in the School for Human Development. Later he joined The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence as its clinical coordinator.

Teruki is the co-director of The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential in Japan, vice director of the Children’s Center, and director of staff training. He also maintains the qualification of intelligence programming. Teruki has been involved in scientific and medical studies. He is an important link between the researchers and investigators both inside and outside of The Institutes, and has been instrumental in facilitating many new and experimental endeavors in child brain development, functional neurology, and biochemistry. He is a member of the IRB (Internal Review Board) of The Institutes.

As a member of the editorial board of The In-Report, Teruki is responsible for compiling all the victories achieved by the brain-injured children and writes reports about the graduates of The Institutes Home Treatment Program.

Teruki has traveled extensively in Asia, Europe, and American continents for the pursuit of his interest in history, architecture, and fine art. He is certified in child brain development at the teaching level. He has been awarded the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor, the Translator’s Certificate in Human Development, Sakura Koro Sho, the Raymundo Veras Medal of Humanity and Science, the Leonardo da Vinci Medal, and the Statuette with Pedestal. He is a founding member of the International Academy for Child Brain Development.


Olivia Fernandes Pelligra, Director of International Affairs, The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence

Olivia was born in Destero do Melo and grew up in Barbacena, Minas Garais, Brazil. She attended a teaching school in Barbacena and received her teaching diploma in 1975.

Olivia then began to teach in a special school in Barbacena. In 1979 she was invited to Centro De Reabilitacao Nossa Senhora da Gloria in Rio de Janeiro in order to begin her training in Child Brain Development. After returning to Barbacena, she began to work at the Associação Barbacenense de Assistência aos Excepcionais (A.B.A.E.).

In 1985, she was a member of the team that traveled to Portugal with Dr. José Carlos Veras in order to evaluate brain-injured children there. In the fall of 1987, Olivia began her clinical training at The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential in Philadelphia, where she learned how to perform histories and evaluations and to create individual home treatment programs for brain-injured children.

In 1988 she received her university diploma for teaching at Lavras, M.G., Brazil, and in 1990 she received a diploma from the A.B.A.E for the evaluation of children in Brazil.

Today, Olivia is the director of International Affairs for The Institutes. She travels to Mexico once a year to present the What To Do About Your Brain-Injured Child Course. She also travels to Italy twice a year to evaluate and teach the European parents how to do the intellectual programs with their brain-injured children.

When she visits her relatives in Brazil once a year, she spends some time at The Institutes in Barbacena in order to update the staff with the newest information in the treatment of brain-injured children.

Olivia resides in San Francisco, California, with her husband, Dr. Ralph Pelligra, a member of the board of directors of The Institutes. When at home she stays in contact with the families for whom she is the advocate and she contacts families who request the Home Consultation Program.

Olivia has received the Glenn Doman Medal in Brazil. She also received the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor, the Raymundo Veras Medal for Humanity and Science, and the Statuette with Pedestal.


Miki Nakayachi, Associate Director, The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence

Miki was born and raised in Japan. After graduating from Showa Women’s University, she worked for Sony Corporation. In a special child development project established by Sony’s founder, Masaru Ibuka, Miki created a curriculum for teaching English and music to young children. She also studied piano through Dr. Shinichi Suzuki’s program, learning from Mrs. Shizuko Suzuki, a prominent piano teacher in Talent Education.

In 1974 Miki assisted Janet Doman, the director of The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential, in Japan. After she had studied English in Great Britain, she helped to teach English to tiny Japanese children.

Miki came to The Institutes in 1975. She began her training in the School for Human Development, where she coached the brain-injured students through their intensive treatment program of crawling, creeping, running, and brachiation. She also taught intellectual and social programs to the students. Later, Miki became vice director of the School for Human Development.

In 1976 Miki created the Japanese language program for the Early Development classes of the Evan Thomas Institute. This became the foundation for teaching other foreign languages. She then helped found the International School of the Evan Thomas Institute and became a principal teacher in the school.

After her son, Yuuki, was born in 1983, Miki was a full-time professional mother, putting her energy into his physical, intellectual, and social development when he was young.

Miki is an expert in the intellectual development of children. She has taught thousands of parents how to teach intellectual and social programs to their brain-injured and well children. She also taught parents of blind and deaf and insensate children to see, hear, and feel. She has taught many parents of brain-injured children and babies how to communicate while they are unable to speak. She regularly lectures in the United States and Japan.

She is vice director of The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence in Philadelphia and co-director of The Institutes in Japan. Miki has served hundreds of children in the United States, Italy, Japan and England. She continues to be an advocate for brain-injured children from around the world.

Miki is certified in child brain development at the teaching level. She has been awarded the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor, Sakura Koro Sho of Japan, the Raymundo Veras Medal of Humanity and Science, the Leonardo da Vinci Award, and the Statuette with Pedestal.


Eliane Hollanda, E.Lee Archives, The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence

Eliane was born in Curitiba, Brazil. Her education included classes in special education, but it was academic learning only, with no practical application. Her first student was a brain-injured girl, and her mother was among a group of parents who had learned of The Institutes program in Brazil.

The Institutes in Rio de Janeiro was under the directions of Dr. José Carlos Veras, son of Dr. Raymundo Veras. Eliane read the Portuguese translation of What To Do About Your Brain-Injured Child by Glenn Doman, and attended a course given by Dr. Veras in Curitiba. After doing the daily program with her young student, she joined The Institutes staff, becoming more involved in the daily on-campus programs with the children.

Twice Glenn Doman came to Brazil, a memorable event for all of the staff. When Janet Doman visited in 1992, she invited Eliane to come to Philadelphia for further training. After six months she returned to Brazil, but decided that her future was at The Institutes in Philadelphia.

Despite the challenge of learning English, Eliane has been at the helm in the clinic, running “the flow” of families that see the staff on their clinic days. In addition she is trained to perform measurements on each child on the Intensive Treatment Program. This includes measuring the head, chest, height, and weight of each child during their visits. This information is compared to anthropometrical statistics, and the children’s individual growth and development is carefully computed and noted in their charts.

Her other responsibilities include assisting at lectures and meetings. She coordinates correspondence between staff and parents and oversees the enormous E. Lee Archives of patient charts.

For her work with brain-injured children, Eliane has received the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor and the Japanese Medal of Sakuro Koro Sho.


Kathy Myers, Senior Staff, The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence

Kathy was born in Bellwood, Pennsylvania, where she grew up and graduated from high school. During these years her mother taught her to play the piano. Following high school, Kathy attended Appalachian Bible College, majoring in piano. She then worked as a secretary for a life insurance company and as a secretary for a printing plant.

In 1973 Kathy married Alan Myers. When their oldest child, Chip, was four years old, she took the How To Multiply You Baby’s Intelligence Course. Kathy became a full-time professional mother to Chip, born in 1976; Alison, born in 1979; and Ginette, born in 1981. Eventually they joined the On-Campus Program of the Evan Thomas Institute.

When her youngest child entered the International School, Kathy joined the school staff. She became the music director, teaching music theory, composition, and a choral class, and was director of the Junior Class. She later became vice director of the International School.

Kathy is now the administrator of the International School. In this role, she creates class schedules, organizes the curriculum books, and meets regularly with mothers concerning the home program of each student.

As her children graduated from the International School, Kathy home schooled them throughout high school, at their request. She continued her own education at Montgomery County Community College with courses in pre-calculus, calculus, history, and psychology.

Kathy now uses the experience derived from teaching her own children and the International School students to teach the parents of brain-injured children in the clinic.

In 1998 Kathy began her training as a clinical staff member, and is now qualified to take histories, perform evaluations, and teach intelligence programs.

For her work with children, Kathy has received the Brazilian Gold Medal and the Statuette with Pedestal. In 1998, the entire Myers family was awarded the Leonardo da Vinci Medal.


Yoshiko Kumagai, Senior Staff, The Institute for the Achievement of Intellectual Excellence

Yoshiko was born in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. She attended Shukutoku University, where she studied psychology, social welfare and special education. As a college student she gained experience in a developmental research laboratory, where she learned how to teach brain-injured children and their parents.

After graduating, she searched for a place where well children and hurt children could learn together, which lead her to work in the field of integration education. She began to teach at a school for handicapped children while working as a volunteer in the community. As a teacher, she became increasingly curious about why a child’s development was delayed or stopped.

After discovering The Institutes books, she found answers to many of her questions.

In 1991, Yoshiko traveled to The Institutes in Philadelphia, where she was trained as a child brain developmentalist. Each morning she did a program of crawling, creeping, running, brachiation, and gymnastics before continuing her training in the clinic. She also taught Japanese language to students in the International School and in the Early Development Class of the Evan Thomas Institute.

Yoshiko is well versed in the intellectual development of both hurt and well children. Presently she is on the staff of Doman Kenkyusho, an organization established to support The Institutes activities in Japan. She has taken on many roles in the Fukushima Office, including planning and giving courses for well children in Japan.

When The Institutes staff visits Japan twice a year, Yoshiko joins the team to create and teach intellectual programs for brain-injured children on the program. As an advocate for many Japanese brain-injured children, she maintains close contact with families between their revisits with the staff.

For her work with brain-injured children, Yoshiko has been awarded the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor and Sakura Koro Sho of Japan.


The Institute for the Achievement of Physical Excellence


Leia Reilly, Director, The Institute for Physical Excellence

Leia is from Brazil, and is the niece of Dr. Raymundo Veras, founder of the Brazilian Institutes. Before coming to Philadelphia in 1977, she worked for The Institutes in Brazil for two years. There she used her previous training in speech therapy at the Instituto Brasileiro de Otorrinolaringologia, da Faculdade Nacional do Rio de Janeiro.

After her arrival in Philadelphia she worked in the School for Human Development and rose to the level of vice director of the School. During these months Leia developed, with the staff, the Cortical Organization Program and the Laterality Program.

From June to August of 1977, she helped establish the Brazilian campus of the School for Human Development. In July of 1980 Leia returned to Brazil to assist Dr. José Carlos Veras at The Institutes in Rio de Janeiro. She became responsible for all physical, sensory, and physiological programs. Leia ran the Floor Program, the School for Human Development Program, the Evan Thomas Institute, and the Respiratory Patterning Department. She traveled to Brazilian cities and to Portugal to lecture and teach parents of brain-injured children.

In January 1981, Leia married Robin Reilly. Their son was born in 1982, and their daughter was born in 1983. When her children were young, Leia carried out an early development home program with them.

Leia achieved certification in child brain development at the teaching level in November 1989. In 1992 Leia returned to The Institutes in Philadelphia as an associate director of The Institute for the Achievement of Physical Excellence. In 1997 she became the vice director, and in 2000 she became the director of that Institute.

Leia lectures in all of the courses and in the lecture series for parents given by The Institutes. In addition to Brazil, the United States, and Portugal, Leia has served children in Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, Singapore, China and Japan.

For her work with brain-injured children, she received the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor, the Raymundo Veras Award of Science and Humanities, the Ceremony of Inscription, and the Statuette with Pedestal. She is a founding member of the International Academy for Child Brain Development.


Rumiko Ion Doman, Vice Director, The Institute for Physical Excellence

Rumiko was born in Kagawa-ken, Japan. She attended Saint Maria College in Kyoto, where she studied elementary education, psychology, social welfare, and literature.

Following graduation, Rumiko worked with children from infancy to five years old. She then taught in a private elementary school, where she especially enjoyed teaching Japanese literature, creative writing, and music to children. Before and after school hours she tutored children with reading problems.

Rumiko learned of The Institutes through the experiences of Yoichi Fukunaga, a famous Japanese jockey who was profoundly injured during a horse race and was in a coma for more than a year. By following the programs of The Institutes, he learned to walk, talk, write, and eventually ride a horse. His recovery was widely reported throughout Japan.

Rumiko soon learned that The Institutes could help those children who were failing in school and in life. Rumiko came to Philadelphia in 1987 to begin her training in child brain development. As part of her staff training Rumiko crawled, crept, ran, and completed a full gymnastics program with the brain-injured students of the School for Human Development.

She worked with the students at the Pioneer Institute, where she coached the students in independence, leadership, and problem solving. Eventually she rose to the position of director of the School for Human Development, where she was responsible for the physical, intellectual, and physiological program of all the brain-injured young adults in the school.

Rumiko coached the students in singing and in social programs. She also taught swimming to the students of the Evan Thomas Institute. Rumiko is fully qualified in all aspects of the physical development of brain-injured and well children, and she is the advocate for many children around the world. She is associate director of The Institute for the Achievement of Physical Excellence, serving children in the United States and in Japan. She has lectured and taught the parents of brain-injured children from around the world.

For her work with brain-injured children, Rumiko received the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor, Sakura Koro Sho, the Raymundo Veras Medal of Humanity and Science, and The Founder’s award of the Statuette with Pedestal. She is certified in child brain development and is a fellow of the International Academy for Child Brain Development.

Rumiko is married to Erik Doman, the oldest grandchild of Glenn and Katie Doman.


Natividad Teancio Myers, Senior Staff, The Institute for Physical Excellence

Nati was born in Madrid, Spain, where she attended school and trained with the National Gymnastics team for many years. Her love for sports and experience in gymnastics brought her to study physical education and receive a degree at El Instituto Nacional de Educacion Fisica (The National Institute for Physical Education).

After learning about The Institutes work with well and brain-injured children, she wanted to know more about The Institutes treatment methods and philosophies. She first attended the How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence Course in March 1995. After attending the What To Do About Your Brain-Injured Child Course in September 1995, she decided to join the staff and begin her training.

For three months she continued to learn about brain injury by following families during their visits to the clinic and by helping with Spanish translation.

In February 1996, Nati became a staff member of The Institute for the Achievement of Physical Excellence, where she is an evaluator and a programmer for all physical programs. In September 1997 she became a gymnastics instructor for the Evan Thomas Institute Early Development classes and in the International School.

Nati is certified in child brain development and is a fellow of the International Academy for Child Brain Development. In 1997 she received the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor for her work with brain-injured children.

She is married to Chip Myers, The Institutes network administrator. As a professional mother to their two children, she enjoys teaching them at home and seeing them benefit from the early development program.


Rogelio Marty, Senior Staff, The Institute for Physical Excellence

The Institute for the Achievement of Physical Excellence

Rogelio was born and raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He graduated from the Catholic University in Argentina with a bachelor’s degree in business administration.

He worked for the Argentine government as a career diplomat. He then left his public service position and obtained a master of management degree from the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. In the years that followed, he worked for several corporations, including Exxon (Esso in Argentina).

Rogelio’s parents were professors who founded their own private educational institution. This allowed their sons and daughters to be constantly surrounded by students and children. Years later, this experience drove Rogelio to become a professor at the graduate level on a part-time basis, and he taught in his parents’ institution for many years.

Rogelio learned of The Institutes in 2001 after a friend attended the How To Multiply Your Baby’s Intelligence Course in Philadelphia. He immediately fell in love with the children and the programs of The Institutes, and that same year he came to Philadelphia to join The Institutes staff.

His responsibilities include taking histories and evaluating brain-injured children on the program. He also teaches a wide range of physical programs. He is the advocate for many families around the world, and he travels with the staff to Italy twice a year for the revisits of brain-injured children on The Institutes program.

Rogelio and his wife, Irene, live on campus with their three children, who are students in the Evan Thomas Institute.

Rogelio is actively involved in his children’s home programs, and in particular enjoys coaching them in running and swimming.

He is the co-organizer of both the annual triathlon and swimathon held by The Evan Thomas Institute.

He has received the Brazilian Gold Medal of Honor, and in 2006 he was certified in child brain development at the developmentalist level.


Jennifer Myers Capena, Staff Member, The Institute for Physical Excellence

Jennifer was born in Flemington, New Jersey, and grew up in New Hope Pennsylvania, a sleepy river town 60 miles northeast of Philadelphia. As a teen, she volunteered her time to a literary program, teaching illiterate adults how to read.

She attended the University of Virginia, where she received a bachelor’s degree in both psychology and sociology. Following graduation, she decided to continue her studies in education, her real passion, at the University of Pennsylvania, with the intention of receiving a doctorate degree in curriculum development.

In the spring of 1993, Jennifer first heard of the work that Glenn Doman and The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential were doing with children. Intuiting that The Institutes was teaching children in the most natural way possible, Jennifer realized that the way she was being instructed to teach children would never be fully successful. For this reason, she gave up her graduate studies in education.

In 1999, Jennifer became a staff candidate at The Institutes. In May of 2000, she became a staff member, where she trained as an historian and an evaluator. She is a programmer for crawling, creeping, running and brachiation programs.

When her three children were young, she gained inspiration and knowledge from teaching them at home.


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